FAQ's

Dr. Wettstein and staff are dedicated to providing you with a pleasant visit and results that you’re proud to show off. We are ready to help you with questions about scheduling, financial policy, and insurance, to make that part of the process as simple as possible.

What should I expect at my first visit?

We are pleased you have selected Jay B. Wettstein Dentistry to care for your dental needs. We want you to know that we are committed to providing you the highest quality of oral health care in the most gentle, efficient and caring manner possible. During your first visit, we will conduct a thorough examination. This examination will include necessary x-rays and other tools to help us make an accurate diagnosis of the condition of your mouth, teeth and gums. In most instances, we will determine your dental needs and then discuss the suggested treatment with you. We will strive to always be on time for you, except as emergency situations arise. We will appreciate the same courtesy.

Why do I need to have regular dental check-ups?

Periodic oral examinations are essential to maintaining good overall health. Regular dental visits allow us to detect gum disease and other medical conditions in their early stages, when they are most treatable. Studies continually point to the relationship between dental health and overall health. Recent research even reveals a link between gum disease and heart disease. For these reasons, regular dental visits can be an invaluable preventive health measure. Regular visits also allow us to clean your teeth and introduce advances in dentistry that can help your smile look its best.

How often should I have a dental exam and cleaning?

You should have your teeth checked and cleaned at least twice a year, though your dentist or dental hygienist may recommend more frequent visits. Regular dental exams and cleaning visits are essential in preventing dental problems and maintaining the health of your teeth and gums. At these visits, your teeth are cleaned and checked for cavities. Additionally, there are many other things that are checked and monitored to help detect, prevent, and maintain your dental health.

How can cosmetic dentistry help improve the appearance of my smile?

If you’re feeling somewhat self-conscious about your teeth, or just want to improve your smile, cosmetic dental treatments may be the answer to a more beautiful, confident smile. Cosmetic dentistry has become very popular in the last several years, not only due to the many advances in cosmetic dental procedures and materials available today, but also because patients are becoming more and more focused on improving their overall health. This includes dental prevention and having a healthier, whiter, more radiant smile. There are many cosmetic dental procedures available to improve your teeth and enhance your smile. Depending on your particular needs, cosmetic dental treatments can change your smile dramatically, from restoring a single tooth to having a full mouth make-over. Ask your dentist how you can improve the health and beauty of your smile with cosmetic dentistry.

What should I do if a tooth is knocked out?

We’re all at risk for having a tooth knocked out. More than 5 million teeth are knocked out every year! If we know how to handle this emergency situation, we may be able to actually save the tooth. Teeth that are knocked out may be possibly reimplanted if we act quickly, yet calmly, and follow these simple steps: Locate the tooth and handle it only by the crown (chewing part of the tooth), NOT by the roots. DO NOT scrub or use soap or chemicals to clean the tooth. If it has dirt or debris on it, rinse it gently with your own saliva or whole milk. If that is not possible, rinse it very gently with water. Get to a dentist within 30 minutes. The longer you wait, the less chance there is for successful reimplantation.

Why is it important to use dental floss?

Brushing our teeth removes food particles, plaque, and bacteria from all tooth surfaces, except in between the teeth. Unfortunately, our toothbrush can’t reach these areas that are highly susceptible to decay and periodontal (gum) disease. Daily flossing is the best way to clean between the teeth and under the gumline. Flossing not only helps clean these spaces, it disrupts plaque colonies from building up, preventing damage to the gums, teeth, and bone. Plaque is a sticky, almost invisible film that forms on the teeth. It is a growing colony of living bacteria, food debris, and saliva. The bacteria produce toxins (acids) that cause cavities and irritate and inflame the gums. Also, when plaque is not removed above and below the gumline, it hardens and turns into calculus (tartar). This will further irritate and inflame the gums and also slowly destroy the bone. This is the beginning of periodontal disease. How to floss properly: Take 12-16 inches (30-40cm) of dental floss and wrap it around your middle fingers, leaving about 2 inches (5cm) of floss between the hands. Using your thumbs and forefingers to guide the floss, gently insert the floss between teeth using a sawing motion. Curve the floss into a “C” shape around each tooth and under the gumline. Gently move the floss up and down, cleaning the side of each tooth. Floss holders are recommended if you have difficulty using conventional floss. Daily flossing will help you keep a healthy, beautiful smile for life!

I have diabetes. Why is my dentist concerned?

Research today suggests a link between gum disease and diabetes. Research has established that people with diabetes are more prone to gum disease. If blood glucose levels are poorly controlled you may be more likely to develop gum disease and could potentially lose teeth. Like all infections, gum disease can be a factor in causing blood sugar levels to rise and make diabetes harder to control. Be sure to see your Dentist regularly for check-ups and follow home care recommendations. If you notice other conditions such as dry mouth or bleeding gums be sure to talk with your dentist, and don’t forget to mention any changes in medications.

Why do I have to take antibiotics before my dental appointment?

There are certain conditions that require pre-medication with an antibiotic prior to dental treatment to prevent adverse affects and infection that can be caused by bacteria that enter the blood stream during certain treatment. You will want to consult with your Dentist about this prior to treatment.

My pregnancy is affecting my mouth, how can this happen?

About half of women who are pregnant experience a condition called pregnancy gingivitis. This condition can be uncomfortable and cause swelling, bleeding, redness or tenderness in the gum tissue. A more advanced oral health condition called periodontal disease (a serious gum infection that destroys attachment fibers and supporting bone that hold teeth in the mouth) may affect the health of your baby. Studies have shown a relationship between periodontal disease and preterm, low birth-weight babies. In fact, pregnant women with periodontal disease may be seven times more likely to have a baby that’s born too early and too small. The likely culprit is a labor-inducing chemical found in oral bacteria called prostaglandin. Very high levels of prostaglandin are found in women with severe cases of periodontal disease.

How can I get my kids to brush their teeth?

Make it fun! If you are enthusiastic about brushing your teeth, your children will also be enthusiastic. Children want to do the things their parents do. If your children see you brushing your teeth and displaying good dental habits, they will follow. Checking Plaque Removal – To see if any plaque has been missed, you can use a disclosing (staining) tablet or solution. These products are made of harmless vegetable dyes that stain the plaque a bright color, so that you can see where the plaque is. Begin to take your children to the dentist at an early age. All children should be seen by their 1st birthday or 6 months after the eruption of the first tooth. Ask your dentist for other creative ways to get children to brush their teeth.